Arts For Transit - Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Permanent Art Catalogue

Dataset

Name Value
Catalog Link
Metadata Link
Data: JSON 100 Rows
Data: CSV 100 Rows
Host data.ny.gov
Id 4y8j-9pkd
Name Arts For Transit - Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Permanent Art Catalogue
Attribution MTA Headquarters
Category Transportation
Tags arts for transit, permanent art program
Created 2013-04-25T15:16:07Z
Publication Date 2015-09-22T16:48:50Z

Description

Through the Permanent Art Program, Arts for Transit commissions public art that is seen by millions of city-dwellers as well as national and international visitors who use the MTA?s subways and trains. Arts for Transit works closely with the architects and engineers at MTA NYC Transit, Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad, to determine the parameters and sites for the artwork that is to be incorporated into each station scheduled for renovation. Both well-established and emerging artists contribute to the growing collection of works created in the materials of the system -mosaic, ceramic, tile, bronze, steel and glass. Artists are chosen through a competitive process that uses selection panels comprised of visual arts professionals and community representatives which review and select artists. This data provides the branch or station and the artist and artwork information.

Columns

| Included | Schema Type | Field Name        | Name              | Data Type | Render Type |
| ======== | =========== | ================= | ================= | ========= | =========== |
| No       | time        | :updated_at       | updated_at        | meta_data | meta_data   |
| Yes      | series tag  | agency            | Agency            | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | agency_name       | Agency Name       | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | station_name      | Station Name      | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | line              | Line              | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | artist_first_name | Artist First Name | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | artist_last_name  | Artist Last Name  | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | art_title         | Art Title         | text      | text        |
| No       |             | art_date          | Art Date          | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | art_material      | Art Material      | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | art_description   | Art Description   | text      | text        |
| Yes      | series tag  | art_image_link    | Art Image Link    | url       | url         |

Time Field

Value = updated_at
Format & Zone = seconds

Series Fields

Excluded Fields = art_date

Data Commands

series e:4y8j-9pkd d:2015-09-22T09:45:01.000Z t:station_name="Atlantic Terminal" t:art_image_link="http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=1" t:art_material=Granite t:artist_last_name=Wexler t:line="Babylon Branch" t:agency=LIRR t:art_description="The new MTA Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn features an artist/architect collaboration in a soaring, light-filled atrium. The project architects, di Domenico + Partners collaborated with the artists, Allan Wexler and Ellen Wexler, to create a special place of arrival in the entry pavilion which reaches from the street level down to the ticket office, waiting room and LIRR and NYC Transit subways. *The Wexlers created a two-story sculptural balcony and wall that visually evokes the adventure of travel. Titled {Overlook}, its rocky granite form cantilevers above the main concourse at the Terminal, referencing scenic overlooks often found in national parks, where travelers are encouraged to pause and take in the larger scene. The bands of granite also refer to nature found underground in layers of rock. Allan Wexler commented, We sought to create the experience of viewing an urban public space as if it were a nature setting, using granite tiles mathematically pixilated to create nooks and crannies found in rock walls. Ellen Wexler said, We wanted to create a space where one can stop and take in the dynamic energy, which is as exciting as stopping to take in the Grand Canyon or other major vista. *{Overlook} is framed by a pair of sweeping staircases and a glass and stainless steel balcony/railing that flows with the architecture of the space, which promises to be a Brooklyn landmark, akin to Grand Central Terminal's famous clock. *Allan Wexler and Ellen Wexler have created public art works nationwide, often using familiar forms imbued with new meanings and functions, fostering a new way of looking at or using the specific site. The materials used often are construction materials, as in the case of {Overlook}." t:artist_first_name="Allan and Ellen" t:agency_name="Long Island Rail Road" t:art_title=Overlook m:row_number.4y8j-9pkd=1

series e:4y8j-9pkd d:2015-09-22T09:45:01.000Z t:station_name="Valley Stream" t:art_image_link="http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=2" t:art_material="Glass and ceramic mosaic on West Stair Wall, Escalator Wall and Platform Waiting Room" t:artist_last_name=Abrahamsson t:line="Babylon Branch" t:agency=LIRR t:art_description="At Valley Stream Station a series of mosaic works fills the new platform waiting room with works of calming color and charming vistas.  *Portraying the skies and scenery of the area, Swedish-born and Brooklyn-based artist Malin Abrahamsson creates a broad swath of green bands punctuated with more detailed mosaics of local sights, such as a pair of Canadian Geese, a house, and the nearby clock tower. *Two other large mosaic panels hang above the west stairway and escalator, showing a pale blue sky with a touch of green at the bottom, a seagull in flight, and floating clouds. The works bring to commuters a painter's sensibility with views of the rolling lawns and shrubs of the close-by suburbs, under expansive skies." t:artist_first_name=Malin t:agency_name="Long Island Rail Road" t:art_title="On the Trail of the Rising Sun" m:row_number.4y8j-9pkd=2

series e:4y8j-9pkd d:2015-09-22T09:45:01.000Z t:station_name=Merrick t:art_image_link="http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=3" t:art_material="Hand-painted porcelain tile on platform columns" t:artist_last_name=Sonfist t:line="Babylon Branch" t:agency=LIRR t:art_description="Mounted on the elevated train platform's concrete pillars, the series consists of eight panels of hand, painted tile that depict the community's past and its links to the nearby sea.  As the artist described the concept,   I will create a series of tiles tracing the history of Long Island, beginning in the Ice Age, through paintings of rocks and plant life. The next stage would show how the Native Americans interacted with plants and sea life, followed by the first Europeans, who settled in Long Island and established farms and a seafaring industry.  Later, a tourist industry developed, as well as several advanced industries. ... The early history of Merrick describes developed grain farms with cows and sheep.... The railroad eventually became a bridging device to bring together the surrounding communities and contributed greatly to the development of contemporary Long Island.  The artwork was created in conjunction with the installation at the Bellmore Station, the station east of Merrick." t:artist_first_name=Alan t:agency_name="Long Island Rail Road" t:art_title="The Narrative History of Merrick" m:row_number.4y8j-9pkd=3

Meta Commands

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Top Records

| :updated_at | agency | agency_name           | station_name      | line                  | artist_first_name | artist_last_name | art_title                                                           | art_date | art_material                                                                                                         | art_description                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    | art_image_link                                                                                                        | 
| =========== | ====== | ===================== | ================= | ===================== | ================= | ================ | =================================================================== | ======== | ==================================================================================================================== | ================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================== | ===================================================================================================================== | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Atlantic Terminal | Babylon Branch        | Allan and Ellen   | Wexler           | Overlook                                                            | 2009     | Granite                                                                                                              | The new MTA Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn features an artist/architect collaboration in a soaring, light-filled atrium. The project architects, di Domenico + Partners collaborated with the artists, Allan Wexler and Ellen Wexler, to create a special place of arrival in the entry pavilion which reaches from the street level down to the ticket office, waiting room and LIRR and NYC Transit subways. *The Wexlers created a two-story sculptural balcony and wall that visually evokes the adventure of travel. Titled {Overlook}, its rocky granite form cantilevers above the main concourse at the Terminal, referencing scenic overlooks often found in national parks, where travelers are encouraged to pause and take in the larger scene. The bands of granite also refer to nature found underground in layers of rock. Allan Wexler commented, We sought to create the experience of viewing an urban public space as if it were a nature setting, using granite tiles mathematically pixilated to create nooks and crannies found in rock walls. Ellen Wexler said, We wanted to create a space where one can stop and take in the dynamic energy, which is as exciting as stopping to take in the Grand Canyon or other major vista. *{Overlook} is framed by a pair of sweeping staircases and a glass and stainless steel balcony/railing that flows with the architecture of the space, which promises to be a Brooklyn landmark, akin to Grand Central Terminal's famous clock. *Allan Wexler and Ellen Wexler have created public art works nationwide, often using familiar forms imbued with new meanings and functions, fostering a new way of looking at or using the specific site. The materials used often are construction materials, as in the case of {Overlook}. | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=1, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Valley Stream     | Babylon Branch        | Malin             | Abrahamsson      | On the Trail of the Rising Sun                                      | 2008     | Glass and ceramic mosaic on West Stair Wall, Escalator Wall and Platform Waiting Room                                | At Valley Stream Station a series of mosaic works fills the new platform waiting room with works of calming color and charming vistas. *Portraying the skies and scenery of the area, Swedish-born and Brooklyn-based artist Malin Abrahamsson creates a broad swath of green bands punctuated with more detailed mosaics of local sights, such as a pair of Canadian Geese, a house, and the nearby clock tower. *Two other large mosaic panels hang above the west stairway and escalator, showing a pale blue sky with a touch of green at the bottom, a seagull in flight, and floating clouds. The works bring to commuters a painter's sensibility with views of the rolling lawns and shrubs of the close-by suburbs, under expansive skies.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=2, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Merrick           | Babylon Branch        | Alan              | Sonfist          | The Narrative History of Merrick                                    | 1993     | Hand-painted porcelain tile on platform columns                                                                      | Mounted on the elevated train platform's concrete pillars, the series consists of eight panels of hand, painted tile that depict the community's past and its links to the nearby sea. As the artist described the concept, I will create a series of tiles tracing the history of Long Island, beginning in the Ice Age, through paintings of rocks and plant life. The next stage would show how the Native Americans interacted with plants and sea life, followed by the first Europeans, who settled in Long Island and established farms and a seafaring industry. Later, a tourist industry developed, as well as several advanced industries. ... The early history of Merrick describes developed grain farms with cows and sheep.... The railroad eventually became a bridging device to bring together the surrounding communities and contributed greatly to the development of contemporary Long Island. The artwork was created in conjunction with the installation at the Bellmore Station, the station east of Merrick.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=3, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Bellmore          | Babylon Branch        | Alan              | Sonfist          | The Narrative History of Bellmore                                   | 1993     | Hand-painted porcelain tile on platform columns                                                                      | Created in tandem with his work at nearby Merrick station, the series consists of eight panels of hand-painted tile that depict the community's past and its links to the nearby sea. The tile is mounted on the elevated train platform's concrete pillars. As artist Alan Sonfist described the concept, I will create a series of tiles tracing the history of Long Island, beginning in the Ice Age, through paintings of rocks and plant life. The next stage would show how the Native Americans interacted with plants and sea life, followed by the first Europeans, who settled in Long Island and established farms and a seafaring industry...Later, a tourist industry developed, as well as several advanced industries.... At the same time, Bellmore was developing a fishing industry.... The railroad eventually became a bridging device to bring together the surrounding communities and contributed greatly to the development of contemporary Long Island.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=4, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Seaford           | Babylon Branch        | Carson            | Fox              | Blue Sky Pursuit                                                    | 2009     | Laminated and tempered glass                                                                                         | At the Seaford Station 14 laminated glass windows extend the sky, creating a bright blue fantasy filled with butterflies and birds, their flights traced with dots of clear glass that meander, overlap and reveal paths of movement, speaking to migration and the act of travel. The dots also transform the sunlight and enliven the landscape. Artist Carson Fox used bird and butterfly images inspired from Victorian era engravings, an aesthetic where natural life is a lush and swarming profusion. *They were created from a process that includes painting on the glass. The 14 windows, eight on the north side of the waiting room and six on the south, combine to create a special place for commuters as they mark the start of their day in a space made radiant by the artist's vision.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=babylonbranch&artist=1&station=5, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Hempstead         | Hempstead Branch      | Ron               | Baron            | Lost and Found: An Excavation Project                               | 2005     | Cast bronze sculpture and seating in plaza                                                                           | From afar the tower of luggage is puzzling; draw closer and you see that the luggage is cast in bronze and colored in a natural patina. The multi-faceted installation includes special cast bronze seating and memorabilia that speaks to the community's heritage and memories. Among the Long Island-related items are an edition of {Newsday} featuring the Islanders winning the Stanley Cup, an NBA basketball (Julius Erving was from nearby Roosevelt), a Jets football reflecting the team practices at Hofstra University, and yearbooks from Hempstead High School highlighting community events, such as Martin Luther King's address to students of the high school in 1968. Ron Baron refers to himself as a cultural archaeologist; and he culls everyday objects from streets and sidewalks, thrift shops, and garage sales. He then forms his monuments, geological constructs of his finds, which transform the objects into something completely new.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=hempsteadbranch&artist=1&station=2, null]     | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Bay Shore         | Montauk Branch        | Brit              | Bunkley          | Bay Shore Icons                                                     | 1992     | Cast cement relief medallions and frieze on exterior of station                                                      | Brit Bunkley created a suite of modern architectural elements that overlay the station's columns. The cast stone elements include round medallions, symbolic of clocks, at each end of the station that are set above framed icons representing local history and transportation. To highlight the advantages of public transportation, the artist created a frieze portraying cars in a traffic jam. Since I thought the architecture of the waiting areas looked like a 'Prairie Style Doric Temple,' I designed the extended lintel as a Prairie Style window-like structure (which also mimics the LIRR train windows), says the artist. The images within... include pleasure boats, a beach umbrella/arrow with egg (a reference to the egg and dart molding), and a Fire Island lighthouse as a chess piece. Taken together, the work adds visual interest and a holiday spirit to both a commuter station and a major launching point for visits to the seashore.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=montaukbranch&artist=1&station=2, null]       | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Penn Station      | Penn Station          | Andrew            | Leicester        | Ghosts Series                                                       | 1994     | Terra cotta wall murals in five locations and porcelain enamel above escalator                                       | Andrew Leicester's {Ghost Series} consists of five monumental bas-relief terra cotta murals installed throughout the Long Island Rail Road station. The pieces evoke the building's illustrious predecessor, the 1910 Pennsylvania Station building by McKim, Mead and White that was demolished in 1963, an event that triggering the historic preservation movement. Fragments of the old Penn Station are hidden in the lower depths of the building that replaced it, and the murals symbolically reveal the old building now hidden behind new walls. *In {Day and Night}, a 500-square-foot-mural in the main concourse, Leicester reinterprets Adolph Wineman's sculpture of the same name that presided over the old station's entrances, depicting two women flanking a gigantic clock. The artist embedded the date the original building was demolished - 10/28/63 - into the clock's blank face. Other murals include Mercury Man, a reproduction of another sculptural figure, and a porcelain-on-steel rendering of blueprints for the demolished building. Taken together, {Ghost Series} is a compelling memento mori - a reminder that we are mortal.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=pennstation&artist=1&station=1, null]         | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Penn Station      | Penn Station          | Maya              | Lin              | Eclipsed Time                                                       | 1994     | Sand-blasted glass, aluminum, stainless steel, and fiber-optic sculpture in ceiling at Seventh Avenue end of station | In {Eclipsed Time} Maya Lin tries to get commuters to think differently about time and trains. I'm asking for a one-on-one relationship between the viewer and the work, the artist says. The large metal sculpture, installed overhead in the Long Island Rail Road's main concourse at Penn Station, combines industrial craftsmanship with contemporary technology to tell time. When people think about clocks they usually envision hands or digital numbers, explains Lin. Time is measured mathematically and specifically. I wanted to reflect time naturally and chose to use the concept of an eclipse. To create this effect, a solid disk hangs between the light source and a stationary glass disk. Light shines through the glass disk, illuminating the rotunda below. The solid disk travels from east to west and back. An eclipse is created at midnight, as the two disks are aligned and only a penumbra of light shines around the aligned circles. The cycle is repeated daily.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=pennstation&artist=2&station=1, null]         | 
| 1442915101  | LIRR   | Long Island Rail Road | Hicksville        | Port Jefferson Branch | Roy               | Nicholson        | Morning Transit, Hempstead Plain & Evening Transit, Hempstead Plain | 2002     | Glass mosaics on waiting room walls                                                                                  | In the {Morning Transit, Hempstead Plain & Evening Transit, Hempstead Plain} murals, Roy Nicholson takes viewers back in time. The area around Hicksville was once a notable rarity, an example of an original prairie landscape most often associated with the Midwest. Nicholson recaptures that setting, in look and spirit, as if seen from a speeding train. The colors vary according to the time of day depicted - soft green and blue hues for sunrise in {Morning Transit}, and red and blue hues for sunset in {Evening Transit}. Each commuter imagines his or her own personal scenery, says Nicholson. One can look at it over and over again and discover new images. The artist creates a contemplative meditation on landscape and rewards the viewer with an affectionate look back at Long Island before the post-war housing boom forever altered the landscape.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                | [http://web.mta.info/mta/aft/permanentart/permart.html?agency=lirr&line=portjeffersonbranch&artist=1&station=2, null] |